RSS Feed

Data driven decisions on Facebook

Posted on
Image representing Facebook as depicted in Cru...

Image via CrunchBase

UPDATE: October 2011

Seems that with the new Facebook Insights that you can now export all the data that you need to make the below work again without using Export.ly. Plus there are some new metrics too, individual users who have seen each post as well as reach.

Good times!

 

UPDATE:

Export.ly seem to have been taken over by Simply Measured and don’t seem to offer the same, very cost effective, solution as what we did below.  Hoping to find out more, but as you can imagine, I’m very keen to keep using them!

I was having a chat with a colleague last week and she asked me why we update our Facebook page twice a day and how do we make that decision? Was it just a guess or a hunch?

The answer to both was by using data.

At the BHF we have a very healthy Facebook community with lots of engagement, take a look – I am very proud of it. We have worked very hard to make sure that we are talking to our ‘likers’ every day and engaging them in conversation not just broadcasting at them, using our top class content to build better relationships.

But how did we make decisions about when we should post a Facebook update?

In April, we used Export.ly to export the previous 12 months Facebook data to a huge Excel file.

Our Analytics Executive Dan manipulated the Excel file and in a few hours we knew:

  • Time of our updates
  • Amount of likes per post
  • Amount of comments per post
  • Whether posts included a video, photo or if they were just a text update
  • Our top contributors to our page
  • Lots more treasures…

Now we had all that data we could cross reference the time of our updates by comments and likes and find out when updates had higher levels engagement – allowing us to make decisions on when we post using data rather than just a hunch.

We are due another data mine soon and due to the substantial increase in ‘likes’ that we have had since April I think that our timings may change slightly. I’m keen to find out whether our updates with a question are more engaging with our ‘likers’ than one’s without  too as well as some more extensive work into what topics get more engagement (if you’re reading this Dan then that’s what I’m going to ask next week..).

For the record, our highest engagement came between 11:30-13:00 and 18:30-19:30…

N.B We had to pay $50 dollars for our Export.ly file due to the size of our Facebook page, but if you’re managing a page with less ‘likes’ then you may not have to pay at all. (We have 100,000+ likes now).

About these ads

About RKtalks

I mange social media and online communities at the BHF. Lover of digital and social media, football, fashion and food.

7 responses »

  1. Thanks for the insight. Do you find a difference in content/attitude from the different peak audiences at lunchtime / commute home? Do you adjust your updates accordingly? (is the lunchtime audience more critial or social? Does the evening commute audience prefer to comment on more feel-good stories?)

    Reply
  2. Good question Tom and one I am keen to look at. Generally the lunch time rush are more engaged and therefore we go with news stories or more hard hitting stories – that is also a a question of resource because if something kicks off we can manage it better as it is during working hours (whatever those are!).

    We also tend to use the afternoon stories for less newsy stories but for general questions to our ‘likers’ and for competitions etc.

    Reply
  3. I absolutely love stats and think this is fantastic. Very interesting indeed…

    Reply
    • Thanks Serena – I recommend Export.ly to anyone who manages a Facebook page, makes decision making and devising a useful Facebook strategy a lot easier.

      Thanks! :)

      Reply
  4. Pingback: Four Tips for Letting Facebook Tell You What to Do | BroadVision Marketing

  5. Pingback: Best bits: What 2012 holds for your charity – and you

  6. Pingback: Best bits: What 2012 holds for your charity – and you | Online Charity Fund

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: